I recently ran across a study conducted by Search Institute, a company not affiliated in any way with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. This study indicates "40 developmental assets which identify what help young people grow up healthy, caring, and responsible."

The following study by Search Institute confirms the things that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints has been doing since its restoration through the Prophet Joseph Smith.

 

  40 Developmental Assets

Search Institute has identified the following building blocks of healthy development that help young people grow up healthy, caring, and responsible.

Type Asset Name and Definition
SUPPORT
  1. Family Support—Family life provides high levels of love and support
  2. Positive Family Communication—Young person and her or his parent(s) communicate positively, and young person is willing to seek parent(s) advice.
  3. Other adult relationships—Young person receives support from three or more non-parent adults.
  4. Caring neighborhood—Young person experiences caring neighbors.
  5. Caring school climate—School provides a caring, encouraging enviornment.
  6. Parent involvement in schooling—Parent(s) are actively involved in helping young person succeed in school.
EMPOWERMENT
  1. Community values youth—Young person perceives that adults in their community value youth.
  2. Youth as resources—Young people are given useful roles in the community.
  3. Service to others—Young person serves in the community one hour or more per week.
  4. Safety—Young person feels safe at home, school, and in the neighborhood.
BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS
  1. Family boundaries—Family has clear rules and consequences, and monitors the young person’s whereabouts.
  2. School boundaries—School provides clear rules and consequences.
  3. Neighborhood boundaries—Neighbors take responsibility for monitoring young people’s behavior.
  4. Adult role models—Parent(s) and other adults model positive, responsible behavior.
  5. Positive peer influences—Young person’s best friends model responsible behavior.
  6. High Expectations—Both parent(s) and teachers encourage the young person to do well.
CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME
  1. Creative activities—Young person spends three or more houts per week in lessons or practice in music, theater, or other arts.
  2. Youth Programs—Young person spends three or more hours per week in sports, clubs, or organizations at school and/or in community organizations.
  3. Religious community—Young person spends one or more hours per week in activities in a religious institution.
  4. Time at home—Young person is out with friends "with nothing special to do," two or fewer nights per week.
COMMITMENT TO LEARNING
  1. Achievement motivation—Young person is motivated to do well in school.
  2. School engagement—Young person is actively engaged in learning.
  3. Homework—Young person reports doing at least one hour of homework every school day.
  4. Bonding to school—Young person cares about her or his school.
  5. Reading for pleasure—Young person reads for pleasure three or more hours per week.
POSITIVE VALUES
  1. Caring—Young person places high value on helping other people.
  2. Equality and social justice—Young person places high value on promoting equality and reducing hunger and poverty.
  3. Integrity—Young person acts on convictions and stand up for her or his beliefs.
  4. Honesty—Young person "tells the truth even when it is not easy."
  5. Responsibility—Young person accepts and takes personal responsibility.
  6. Restraint—Young person believes it is important not to be sexually active or to use alcohol or other drugs.
SOCIAL COMPETENCIES
  1. Planning and decision-making—Young person knows how to plan ahead and make choices.
  2. Interpersonal competence—Young person has empathy, sensitivity, and friendship skills.
  3. Cultural competence—Young person has knowledge of and comfort with people of different cultural/racial/ethnic backgrounds.
  4. Resistance skills—Young person can resist negative peer pressure and dangerous situations.
  5. Peaceful conflict resolution—Young person seeks to resolve conflict non-violently.
POSITIVE IDENTITY
  1. Personal power—Young person feels he or she has control over "thing that happen to me."
  2. Self esteem—Young person reports having a high self-esteem.
  3. Sense of purpose—Young person reports that "my life has a purpose."
  4. Positive view of personal future—Young person is optimistic about his or her future.

 Permission to reproduce this char is granted for educational, non-commercial purposes only. Copyright 1996 by Search Institute, 700 S. Third Street, Suite 210, Minneapolis, MN 55415. For information on asset building and Search Institute's national Healthy Communities * Healthy Youth initiative, call 1-800-888-7828, or visit our web site at http://www.search-institute.org

 

Protective Consequences of

Developmental Assets

High Risk Patterns

Percent with High Risk Patterns

Category

Definition

If 0-10 Assets

If 11-20 Assets

If 21-30 Assets

If 31-40 Assets

Alcohol Has used alcohol three or more times in the past month or got drunk once or more in the past two weeks.

53

30

11

3

Tobacco Smokes one or more cigarettes ever day or uses chewing tobacco frequently.

 45

21

6

1

Illicit Drugs Used illicit drugs three or more times in the past year.

42

19

6

1

Sexual Intercourse Has had sexual intercourse three or more times in lifetime.

33

21

10

3

Depression/ Suicide Is frequently depressed and/or has attempted suicide.

40

25

13

4

Anti-Social Behavior Has been involved in three or more incidents of shoplifting, trouble with police, or vandalism in the past year.

52

23

7

1

Violence Has engaged in three or more acts of fighting, hitting, injuring a person, carrying or using a weapon, or threatening physical harm in the past year.

61

35

16

6

School Problems Has skipped school two or more days in the past month and/or has below a C average.

43

19

7

2

Driving and Alcohol Has driven after drinking or ridden with a drinking driver three or more times in the past year.

42

24

10

4

Gambling Has gambled three or more times in the past year.

34

23

13

6

 

Thriving Consequences

Of Developmental Assets

Thriving Indicators

Percent with Thriving Indicators

Category

If 0-10 Assets

If 11-20 Assets

If 21-30 Assets

If 31-40 Assets

Succeeds in School: Gets mostly A’s on report card.

7

19

35

53

Helps Others: Helps friends or neighbors one ore more hours per week.

69

83

91

96

Values Diversity: Places high importance on getting to know people of other racial/ethnic groups.

34

53

69

87

Maintains Good Health: Pays attention to healthy nutrition and exercise.

25

46

69

88

Exhibits Leadership: Has been a leader of a group or organization in the last 12 months.

48

67

78

87

Resists Danger: Avoids doing things that are dangerous.

6

15

29

43

Delays Gratification: Saves money for something special rather than spending it all right away.

27

42

56

72

Overcomes Adversity: Does not give up when things get difficult.

57

69

79

86

 In the Bible we are told that "For a good tree bringeth not forth corrupt fruit; neither doth a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit." (Luke 6:43) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints has excellent youth programs which help the youth of the Church stay close to Christ and thus help them want to keep the commandments of the Lord. The Word of Wisdom (D&C 89) is a revelation whose fruit shines in this study. The Church is the biggest single entity to sponsor the Boy Scouts of America program for the young men, and encourages all young men to obtain the rank of eagle through the program. The Boy Scouts of America teaches good moral and ethical standards. Through its Seminary programs the Church gives the youth support while at school.

This page has been visited times since May 24, 1998.